Essential Steps To Know About BGA

Written by Admin on . Posted in PCB, PCB Assembly and component, PCB Manufacturing

bga guide

But although these 3d printed structures are cheap and easy to implement they can lack efficiency. They can be made complex, but for the moment complex 3d printed PCBs are difficult to produce in large volumes. Essential Steps to Know about BGA

When working with PCBs there can be many terms and acronyms that are confusing, and one such term is BGA. BGA, or Ball Grid Array, is a small package on a printed circuit board that is used to mount or hold microprocessors, completing integrated circuits. This article will provide 4 easy steps to get used to and understand BGAs.

Step 1: Benefits of using BGA

There are several different systems in place in order to mount devices in an integrated circuit. One of the earliest is the PGA, or Pin Grid Array, which had many pins to connect the circuit as opposed to pads, which the BGA system has. Although the PGA worked for several years, as technology advanced the pins were more and more compacted together and were not as efficient as BGA, which uses pads that conform to the circuit through solder, which is heated and then melted onto the board. BGA is also efficient when it comes to overheating, as it is able to release heat extremely well preventing the temperature of the circuit rising. This is due to lower thermal resistance of the mounting package. BGAs, because they are so close to the printed circuit board they reside on, have better electrical performance.

Also read: Solder Mask Design Changes Help Prevent BGA Pad Lifting

Step 2: Setbacks of the BGA

As with every piece of technology, there are some unfortunate disadvantages that the BGA has which you must understand if you are working with them. Luckily, the cons are not many, nor will they affect the circuit: it is still your job to prevent any problems as a result of these drawbacks. To begin with, BGAs are less flexible than previous iterations of grid arrays, meaning that bending or breakage may occur in a non-stabilized environment. Similarly, if you have a BGA under extreme conditions, such as extreme heat or extreme pressure, the solder on the BGA can fail to connect the components of the package. If you keep your BGAs in a stable system when manufacturing or working with them, then most of these problems will not affect you.

Step 3: Inspection

BGAs can be hard to inspect for issues when a circuit is no longer working, sometimes requiring X-ray inspection or a CT scanning machine to determine the cause of the problem with the circuit. Due to this, make sure you have the necessary equipment to work on the BGAs, and if you cannot afford to visually scan it, electrical techniques can also be useful, and physically inspecting the BGA is a cheap but dangerous method that can be used as well.

Step 4: Knowing the terminology

Although you are by now familiar with “BGA”, there are multiple other kinds of ball grid arrays that sound but are definitely not similar to BGAs, such as “CABGA”, which stands for Chip Array Ball Grid Array, and “MBGA”, which stands for Micro Ball Grid Array. A full list of variants on the BGA line of equipment can be found online, and we recommend that you check it out to fully familiarize yourself with all types of grid arrays.

View on PCB Design and Implementation today and in the future

Written by Admin on . Posted in PCB, PCB Design

view on pcb design

PCBs are the cornerstone of just about all modern electronics, and they evolve along with the rest of the field. So what is the future of the PCB? The first things we’re likely to see is PCBs shrinking to meet the increasingly intense demand for thinner, lighter, and more powerful electronics. But these changes are just the tip of the iceberg. It’s also possible that we’ll see PCBs take a more active role in their devices. Currently they act as relays of a sort. They’re designed to carry electrical current, but what if they could take a more active role? As technology progresses we’re going to start even more seeing integrated logic and other components within PCBs themselves. This isn’t entirely new technology, but as implementation improves we’re going to see it making a huge difference in how devices function. It is vastly more efficient to have components integrated into the PCB because travel time for currents can be reduced, and even more importantly manufacturers will be able to cut down on wasted space within their designs. This technology is also going to allow for leaps in asynchronous processing which will allow for faster transfer speeds. Already we see transfer speeds on the order of several gigabits. We are rapidly approaching the point where PCB optimization is critical to creating good devices.

 

The Future lies in 3D printing

R&D will be critical but of course even the best technologies can fall by the wayside if they’re not economical enough or easy enough to manufacture. This is where emerging technologies like 3d printing will shine. We’ll see printers printing with conductive materials and manufacturing PCBs far more efficiently than would ever have been possible with more traditional laminated frameworks. 3d printers are now becoming capable of printing copper and other materials, and they can do so onto almost any materials. As a net effect this means that it will become far easier to implement cheap electronics into just about any household object. Printing PCBs with this method could cost as little as $50 for each meter of printed electronics. But although these 3d printed structures are cheap and easy to implement they can lack efficiency. They can be made complex, but for the moment complex 3d printed PCBs are difficult to produce in large volumes.

 

If you want to see the future of PCBs it is here already with Micro Electronic flex boards with 1 mil lines and spaces

 

Additionally, PCBs can be flexible, transparent, and durable. There flex and rigid flex PCBs as well three dimensional PCBs. There are also rolled flex boards that can be up to 30 feet long. There are also very sophisticated PCBs. Microvias for example, are used in a number of applications interconnecting the fused layers in PCBs and creating far denser circuits capable of accepting more complex components. This is just another innovation which will allow for smaller and more efficient PCBs. In summary. PCBs will continue get faster, smaller, and more efficient in the short term, but what is in store for us longer term? Here is a safe bet, things will get smaller and more complex. If you want to see what PCBs will look like in the future look at Micro Electronic Circuits such as the ones that go into very advanced hearing aids and in medical electronics such as a diagnostic capsule that you swallow and the boards that go into ultrasound wands. These are tiny flex boards with 1 mil lines and spaces. Now that’s the future.

Pcb Assembly humidity

Why it is Necessary to Control Humidity in PCB Assemblies

Written by Admin on . Posted in PCB Assembly and component

Pcb Assembly humidity

A Printed circuit board is quite literally an insulated board on which wire is laid to create a circuit. They are a critical and very necessary part of all electronic products. They are in everything from complex computers to basic smartphones. Since they are the base for the circuits that transfer electricity, if they were not included in an average electric machine that machine would just not work not to mention the fact that there would be no place to put the components. The market for PCBs is currently at $60 Billion, that’s Billion with a “B” and growing.
Just like any other electronics, require careful conditions during production to ensure that the integrity of the board is maintained before shipping. In general, things like dust, heat, and the focus of this article, humidity, will have an effect on the PCB.

Also Read: Printed Circuit Board (PCB) Assembly
Just like dust can interfere with and even interrupt circuits, and heat can cause some metal within the circuits to melt, humidity, meaning the amount of moisture in the air, can allow current to run through unwanted areas of the circuit board, causing extreme damage to the board and the circuits on it. Although that should be enough to prove that control over humidity, there are additional factors that could be hazardous to the board, and, by extension, the equipment that it is a part of. Imagine if an expensive new desktop computer fell apart, or in a more extreme example, a computer-guided car or airplane failed mid-transit.
Too much moisture in the board can cause numerous problems from delamination to solderability issues. It is a very simple fact that moisture is not good for any electronic component and this is especially true when it comes to PCBs. Reality is that PCBs are extremely absorbent so both the builder and the end user must use extreme caution when avoiding moisture.
If you are an end user in a high humidity state such as Florida it is highly recommended that you pre-bake the boards before you solder them. Yes, the fabricator will have packed them with desiccant packs to keep the moisture down. But even the short time that the boards are exposed to humidity before they are put into the assembly process can be enough for that board to absorb too much moisture.
The most recommended way of keeping your products safe is to keep a humidity level at around %50, or between %40-%60, which will let the PCBs stay dry while not drying out completely or causing static discharge, which can occur below this level of humidity: a normal amount of moisture in the air only will not affect them.
Remember moisture is our enemy. But baking the moisture out the boards prior to the assembly process is the simplest and most cost-effective way to keep your boards safe and dry.