Essential Steps To Know About BGA

Written by Admin on . Posted in PCB, PCB Assembly and component, PCB Manufacturing

bga guide

But although these 3d printed structures are cheap and easy to implement they can lack efficiency. They can be made complex, but for the moment complex 3d printed PCBs are difficult to produce in large volumes. Essential Steps to Know about BGA

When working with PCBs there can be many terms and acronyms that are confusing, and one such term is BGA. BGA, or Ball Grid Array, is a small package on a printed circuit board that is used to mount or hold microprocessors, completing integrated circuits. This article will provide 4 easy steps to get used to and understand BGAs.

Step 1: Benefits of using BGA

There are several different systems in place in order to mount devices in an integrated circuit. One of the earliest is the PGA, or Pin Grid Array, which had many pins to connect the circuit as opposed to pads, which the BGA system has. Although the PGA worked for several years, as technology advanced the pins were more and more compacted together and were not as efficient as BGA, which uses pads that conform to the circuit through solder, which is heated and then melted onto the board. BGA is also efficient when it comes to overheating, as it is able to release heat extremely well preventing the temperature of the circuit rising. This is due to lower thermal resistance of the mounting package. BGAs, because they are so close to the printed circuit board they reside on, have better electrical performance.

Also read: Solder Mask Design Changes Help Prevent BGA Pad Lifting

Step 2: Setbacks of the BGA

As with every piece of technology, there are some unfortunate disadvantages that the BGA has which you must understand if you are working with them. Luckily, the cons are not many, nor will they affect the circuit: it is still your job to prevent any problems as a result of these drawbacks. To begin with, BGAs are less flexible than previous iterations of grid arrays, meaning that bending or breakage may occur in a non-stabilized environment. Similarly, if you have a BGA under extreme conditions, such as extreme heat or extreme pressure, the solder on the BGA can fail to connect the components of the package. If you keep your BGAs in a stable system when manufacturing or working with them, then most of these problems will not affect you.

Step 3: Inspection

BGAs can be hard to inspect for issues when a circuit is no longer working, sometimes requiring X-ray inspection or a CT scanning machine to determine the cause of the problem with the circuit. Due to this, make sure you have the necessary equipment to work on the BGAs, and if you cannot afford to visually scan it, electrical techniques can also be useful, and physically inspecting the BGA is a cheap but dangerous method that can be used as well.

Step 4: Knowing the terminology

Although you are by now familiar with “BGA”, there are multiple other kinds of ball grid arrays that sound but are definitely not similar to BGAs, such as “CABGA”, which stands for Chip Array Ball Grid Array, and “MBGA”, which stands for Micro Ball Grid Array. A full list of variants on the BGA line of equipment can be found online, and we recommend that you check it out to fully familiarize yourself with all types of grid arrays.

Pcb Assembly humidity

Why it is Necessary to Control Humidity in PCB Assemblies

Written by Admin on . Posted in PCB Assembly and component

Pcb Assembly humidity

A Printed circuit board is quite literally an insulated board on which wire is laid to create a circuit. They are a critical and very necessary part of all electronic products. They are in everything from complex computers to basic smartphones. Since they are the base for the circuits that transfer electricity, if they were not included in an average electric machine that machine would just not work not to mention the fact that there would be no place to put the components. The market for PCBs is currently at $60 Billion, that’s Billion with a “B” and growing.
Just like any other electronics, require careful conditions during production to ensure that the integrity of the board is maintained before shipping. In general, things like dust, heat, and the focus of this article, humidity, will have an effect on the PCB.

Also Read: Printed Circuit Board (PCB) Assembly
Just like dust can interfere with and even interrupt circuits, and heat can cause some metal within the circuits to melt, humidity, meaning the amount of moisture in the air, can allow current to run through unwanted areas of the circuit board, causing extreme damage to the board and the circuits on it. Although that should be enough to prove that control over humidity, there are additional factors that could be hazardous to the board, and, by extension, the equipment that it is a part of. Imagine if an expensive new desktop computer fell apart, or in a more extreme example, a computer-guided car or airplane failed mid-transit.
Too much moisture in the board can cause numerous problems from delamination to solderability issues. It is a very simple fact that moisture is not good for any electronic component and this is especially true when it comes to PCBs. Reality is that PCBs are extremely absorbent so both the builder and the end user must use extreme caution when avoiding moisture.
If you are an end user in a high humidity state such as Florida it is highly recommended that you pre-bake the boards before you solder them. Yes, the fabricator will have packed them with desiccant packs to keep the moisture down. But even the short time that the boards are exposed to humidity before they are put into the assembly process can be enough for that board to absorb too much moisture.
The most recommended way of keeping your products safe is to keep a humidity level at around %50, or between %40-%60, which will let the PCBs stay dry while not drying out completely or causing static discharge, which can occur below this level of humidity: a normal amount of moisture in the air only will not affect them.
Remember moisture is our enemy. But baking the moisture out the boards prior to the assembly process is the simplest and most cost-effective way to keep your boards safe and dry.

Uses of Printed Circuit Board Components & Technology

Written by Admin on . Posted in PCB, PCB Assembly and component, PCB Design

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A printed circuit board by itself is a very simple piece of technology: it is a board on which a circuit is laid out. However, oftentimes when people refer to a PCB they are also referring to the components that form the beginning of the circuit. The circuit is essential to the entire piece of equipment the board is in, which is why people include it when talking about the PCB. These include the necessary power supply, along with various other parts. This article will explain the different components in a PCB and the circuit that goes with it.

Also Read: PCB Fabrication Making a World of Possibilities a Realty

A printed circuit board first has a side of copper trace on it, which carries electricity around the board to complete the circuit. A PCB can have many different layers, but there will always be at least one side with copper tracing on it, bringing charge to the necessary places. The layers are important, however, since more complex electronics require more and more layers. The layers are made largely out of copper with various other metals around the edges, though it is what’s on the board that’s important. As the charge travels through the tracing, it also passes through the components of the PCB. The charge is diminished depending on what resistors it encounters, and when it is transferred through a transistor the charge grows to whatever it needs to be in order to power the electronics. There are also parts that will let charges through or block them depending on their positions, such as diodes and switches.
The circuits laid out on the boards are still not very impressive, however. The real value of PCBs come from the fact that they make up so many forms of technology. If you are a PCB manufacturer and you are reading this article wondering about what kinds of uses you can market your boards with, just consider the many ways they are applied around the world. There are hardly any electronic devices that don’t contain circuit boards, in fact: PCBs are in microwaves, every kind of computer, and practically anything that can be programmed a certain way: which includes calculators and even most modern cars. As technology advances, it is sure that we will still rely on PCBs to be the backbone of the latest electronics- meaning that there will be a huge demand for printed circuit boards in the foreseeable future.

Also Read: The Advantages of On-Demand Manufacturing

But how exactly does a PCB allow these complex electronics to work, you ask? Well, this is the simplest aspect of the PCB: by itself, it can’t really do anything except power the LEDs and other components that are on the board. But when it is connected to other parts in a larger system, it can deliver electric charge to those parts and support the whole system physically due to the sturdiness of the boards. It delivers electricity through the copper tracing: really the key to the entire board and by extension, all the electronics the boards appear in.